Mint Leaves Turning Brown? (Causes and Fixes!)

Mint is such an extraordinary versatile herb. It can be used in sweet or savory dishes, is great for teas and juices, and has many health benefits.

However, mint can be finicky when it comes to growing both indoors and out. If you notice your mint leaves turning brown, it is most likely from overwatering, sunlight, pests, or disease.

Luckily, if you catch the problem early enough, there is usually a way to fix it and get your plant back to good health. Keep reading to learn more about mint leaves turning brown and what you can do about it!

Mint Leaves Turning Brown from Overwatering

If you notice that the tips of your mint leaves are turning brown, it is most likely from overwatering. When a plant is overwatered, the roots can’t get the oxygen they need to thrive, and the plant starts to suffocate. Over watering can cause the leaves to turn yellow and brown and eventually die.

The Fix

If you think your mint plants are being overwatered, the best thing to do is to let them dry out for a day or two. Place them in a nice warm indirect sunlight spot, and do not water them. It’s ok to let the soil dry to the touch on the top layer.

If the leaves still look wilted and brown after a couple of days, you can try trimming off the affected leaves.
Once you’ve let the plant dry out and trimmed off any dead leaves, water your mint plant less frequently. Allow the soil to dry out completely before watering again. It’s better to underwater a plant than to overwater it. Mint is relatively resilient and can withstand a little drought.

Mint Leaves Turning Brown from UnderWatering

If the leaves on your mint plant are wilting and turning brown, it is most likely from underwatering. When a plant doesn’t get enough water, the leaves start to droop and turn brown as a way to conserve moisture. The plant leaves will turn brown because it is not getting the water it needs to stay green.

The Fix

If you think your mint plant is being under-watered, the best thing to do is to water it deeply and let the soil dry out completely before watering again. Check the ground before watering to make sure it is dry. You should be able to stick your finger about an inch into the soil before watering.
You can bottom water mint plants by setting them in a bowl or saucer of water and letting the roots soak up the water for a few hours. This is an excellent way to water deeply without overdoing it.

Brown Mint Leaves from Pests

It could be from pests if you notice brown spots or holes on your mint leaves. Aphids, spider mites, and white flies are common pests that can attack mint plants.

Aphids are small, pear-shaped insects that are usually green but can also be black, brown, or yellow. They suck the sap out of plants, which can cause leaves to turn yellow or brown and eventually die.

Spider mites are tiny spider-like creatures that feed on the underside of leaves. They can cause leaves to turn yellow or brown and eventually drop off the plant. They will also spin a web around the leaves and stems of the plant. This will make the plant look dusty.

Whiteflies are small, winged insects that are usually white or light yellow. They suck the sap out of plants, which can cause leaves to turn yellow or brown and eventually die.

The Fix

If you think your mint plant has pests, the best thing to do is to inspect it closely. Look for minor bugs or spider webs on the underside of the leaves. You can also look for brown spots or holes in the leaves. Remove any leaves with a large number of pests on them.

You can also try hosting your plant with water to remove any pests hanging out on the leaves.

If you find pests on your mint plant, there are several ways to get rid of them. You can try using a solid stream of water to knock the pests off the plant. Neem oil is a good option for getting rid of pests. Use equal parts neem oil and water and spray it on your plant. You can also wipe the plant leaves with a cloth soaked in soapy water. This will kill any pests that are on the plant.

Pyrethrin is another option for getting rid of pests. It is a natural insecticide made from the chrysanthemum flower. Use equal parts water and pyrethrin and spray it on your plant.

You can also try making a homemade pesticide by mixing one teaspoon dish soap with 1 quart of water. Spray the mixture on the plant leaves, being sure to coat the undersides of the leaves.

Companion plants can also help to keep pests away from your mint plant. They will attract helpful insects that will eat the pests or repel the pests with their strong scent.
Some good companion plants for mint are basil, marigold, and garlic. Never plant mint alongside fennel, as this can attract pests.

Mint Leaves Turning Brown from Disease

Mint plants can also be affected by diseases, such as powdery mildew, leaf blight, or rust. If you see brown leaves that are also covered in a white powder or have yellow spots, it’s likely due to disease. Treat the plant with an organic fungicide, and remove any affected leaves so the infection doesn’t spread.

Powdery Mildew

Powdery mildew is a white powdery fungus that grows on the leaves of plants. It can cause the leaves to turn brown and eventually die. This looks like the plant has been dusted with flour.

Leaf Blight

Leaf blight is a type of fungal disease that causes brown spots on the leaves of plants. The spots can eventually turn yellow and then brown as the disease progresses. This looks like the leaves are rotting or decaying.

Rust

Rust is a type of fungal disease that causes yellow or brown spots on the leaves of plants. The spots can eventually turn into rust-colored bumps and is very noticeable.

The Fix

If you think your mint plant has powdery mildew, leaf blight, or rust, the best thing to do is to treat the plant with an organic fungicide. You can also try making your own fungicide with dish soap and water. Make sure to remove any affected leaves, so the disease doesn’t spread.

Brown Mint Leaves from Temperature

If the leaves on your mint plant turn brown, it could also be due to the temperature. Mint plants like cool temperatures and do not do well in hot, humid weather. If the leaves on your plant are turning brown and the weather is hot and humid, it’s likely due to the temperature.

The Fix

If you think the temperature is causing the leaves on your mint plant to turn brown, the best thing to do is move the plant to a cooler location. You can also try misting the leaves with water to help keep them cool.

Mint Leaves Turning Brown from Nutrient Deficiency

If the leaves on your mint plant turn yellow or brown, it could also be due to a nutrient deficiency. Mint plants need a lot of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium to stay healthy. If the leaves on your plant are turning yellow or brown and the plant is not getting enough of these nutrients, it’s likely due to a nutrient deficiency.

The Fix

If you think a nutrient deficiency is causing the leaves on your mint plant to turn yellow or brown, the best thing to do is to fertilize the plant with a nitrogen-rich fertilizer. You can also try adding some compost to the soil to help improve the nutrient content.

Preventing Mint Leaves from Turning Brown

The best way to prevent mint leaves from turning brown is to water the plant properly, fertilize it regularly, keep out of the direct sun, and inspect it regularly for pests or diseases. Water your mint plant when the soil is dry to the touch. Be sure to water at the base of the plant, so the leaves don’t get wet. Inspect your plant regularly for pests or diseases and take action immediately if you notice anything.

You can also try growing your mint plant in a pot with drainage holes to prevent overwatering. Be sure to use a light potting mix and provide plenty of airflow around the plant. Inspect the plant regularly and take action if you notice any problems.

Other Issues with Mint

mint leaves turning brownMint Leaves Turning Brown and Curling

If you notice that your mint leaves are turning brown and curling, it is most likely from too much sun. Mint prefers shady locations; too much sun can cause the leaves to turn brown and curl up.

If you think your mint plant is getting too much sun, the best thing to do is to move it to a shadier location. You can also try trimming off any affected leaves.

Mint Leaves Turning Yellow

If you notice that your mint leaves are turning yellow, it is most likely from a lack of nutrients. Be sure to fertilize your plant regularly and provide it with plenty of sunlight. You can also try trimming off the affected leaves.

Mint Leaves Turning Black

If you notice that your mint leaves are turning black, it is most likely from disease. Be sure to remove any affected leaves and dispose of them in the trash. You can also try using a fungicide to treat the plant.

Mint Leaves Turning White

If you notice that your mint leaves are turning white, it is most likely from disease. Be sure to remove any affected leaves and dispose of them in the trash. You can also try using a fungicide to treat the plant.

There are a few different reasons why mint leaves might turn brown. The most common cause is from over watering or pests. Be sure to water your plant correctly and inspect it regularly for pests or diseases. You can also try trimming off the affected leaves.

Growing Mint Indoors

If you want to grow mint indoors, the best thing to do is to plant it in a pot with drainage holes. Be sure to use a light potting mix and provide plenty of airflow around the plant.

When growing mint indoors, keeping the plant in a sunny location is essential. Mint needs at least six hours of sunlight daily to stay healthy. If you can’t provide enough sunlight, you can try using grow lights. Do not place in direct sun as this could scorch the leaves.

It’s also important to water your mint plant regularly. Water the plant when the soil is dry to the touch, and be sure to water at the base of the plant, so the leaves don’t get wet.

You can also try fertilizing your mint plant every two weeks with a nitrogen-rich fertilizer.

Growing mint indoors can be done with a hydroponic system. The plant roots are suspended in water with hydroponics, and nutrients are delivered directly to them. This system is very efficient and can produce high yields.

When growing mint hydroponically, it’s essential to use a high-quality water filter. This will remove any impurities from the water that could harm the plant. It’s also crucial to use a nutrient solution designed for hydroponics.

What are the Benefits of Mint?

Mint is a popular herb that has many uses. The leaves can make tea, mint extract, or mint oil. Mint is also used in cooking, as a garnish, or to make mint jelly.

Mint is a good source of vitamin A and antioxidants. It also contains menthol, which can help relieve congestion.
Mint can also be used to make a homemade insecticide. Mix 1 cup of mint leaves with 1 quart of water and let it steep for 24 hours. Strain the mixture and spray it on your plants to keep pests away.

Eating mint can also help with digestion and can freshen your breath.

Mint plants are easy to grow and can be planted in the spring or fall. They prefer shady locations and well-drained soil. Mint plants can spread quickly, so be sure to plant them in an area with room to grow.

Can You Eat Mint Leaves That Have Gone Brown?

If the leaves are only slightly brown, you can still use them. Just trim off the brown parts and use the rest. They’ll be tough and bitter if the leaves are too far gone. It’s best to compost them or throw them away.

When it comes to mint plants, a little bit of browning is normal. But if the leaves turn brown and fall off, it’s a sign that something is wrong. By figuring out the cause and taking corrective action, you can get your mint plant back on track in no time.

How Do You Grow Mint?

Mint plants are easy to grow and can be started from seed, cuttings, or divisions. They prefer shady locations and well-drained soil. Mint plants can spread quickly, so be sure to plant them in an area with room to grow.

You can start mint seeds indoors 6-8 weeks before the last frost. Sow the seeds on the surface of the soil and keep them moist. Once they germinate, transplant them into pots or outdoors.

Snip a 6-8 inch piece of stem from a healthy plant to take cuttings. Remove the lower leaves and plant the cutting in a pot of moist soil. Keep the cutting warm and wet until it roots.

To divide a mint plant:

  • Dig up the entire plant into smaller sections.
  • Replant the divisions in new pots or outdoors.
  • Water the plants well and keep them moist until they are established.

Runners can also propagate mint plants. Runners are long, slender stems that grow out from the main plant. They will root where they touch the ground and form new plants. To propagate by runners, dig up the runner and replant it in a new location.

Conclusion

Mint plants are easy to grow and can be started from seed, cuttings, or divisions. They prefer shady locations and well-drained soil. Mint plants can spread quickly, so be sure to plant them in an area with room to grow.
If you notice that your mint leaves are turning brown, black, or white, it is most likely from disease.

Be sure to remove any affected leaves and dispose of them in the trash. You can also try using a fungicide to treat the plant.

Eating mint can help with digestion and can freshen your breath. Mint plants are also easy to grow and can be used to make a homemade insecticide. Just keep an eye on the plant, as it can spread quickly. If you have any questions, please feel free to ask in the comments below!

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