Philodendron Imperial Green

Caring for the Glorious Philodendron Imperial Green

With a gorgeous display of large glossy green leaves, Philodendron Imperial Green is a stunning addition to any indoor plant collection. It displays beautiful broad, glossy leaves that resemble elephant ears. These leaves look very classy and shiny during the day, with a bright light reflecting them.

Unlike other Philodendron varieties, it is self-heading, which means it doesn’t require support to grow. It has a well-established root system that goes into the soil deeply. It also develops aerial roots that absorb moisture from the atmosphere.

It grows slowly in indoor conditions as compared to in its natural habitat. This easy-care houseplant can reach up to 3 feet in height, making it a perfect candidate for filling empty spaces in your home. It closely resembles its cousins Philodendron Imperial Red, Philodendron Prince of Orange, and Philodendron Congo.

Quick Summary Guide

Lighting: Philodendron Imperial Green does best in bright, indirect sunlight.
Watering: Allow the top few inches of soil to dry out in between watering.
Fertilizing: Feed monthly during the spring and summer with a general-purpose fertilizer
Temperature: Average room temperatures of 65-75 degrees Fahrenheit.
Humidity: Philodendron Imperial Green thrives in humid conditions. T
Soil: Philodendron Imperial Green prefers a light, well-draining soil.
Pests and Diseases: These plants are susceptible to mealybugs, aphids, and spider mites. It is also vulnerable to root rot and leaf spot.
Toxicity: It is toxic to humans and animals if ingested.

Origin and History

Philodendron Imperial Green is a tropical plant native to South America, discovered in 1977 in Florida. It is found in the rainforests of Brazil, Colombia, and Peru. It is a part of the family Araceae which contains around 4700 species of flowering plants. In its natural environment, it grows under the canopies of tall trees, where it receives dappled sunlight.

Philodendron Imperial Green was introduced to the horticulture trade in 1983 by Phil Riddle of Riddle’s Tropical Nursery in Apopka, Florida. It has been a part of American gardens since then and has become a popular houseplant. The Royal Horticultural Society gave the plant the Award of Garden Merit (AGM) in 1993.

Philodendron Imperial Green is also known by many other names such as Philodendron Brasil, Philodendron Gloriosum, Philodendron Hope, Philodendron Verrucosum, and Tree Philodendron.

Some interesting facts about Philodendron Imperial Green are that it is considered a natural air purifier and helps improve indoor air quality. It is known to remove harmful toxins such as formaldehyde, xylene, and toluene from the atmosphere.

Philodendron Imperial Green makes for an ideal houseplant because it doesn’t require too much care and can thrive in a wide range of indoor conditions. If you’re looking for a Philodendron that is sure to make a statement, Philodendron Imperial Green is a perfect choice!

Follow this guide to learn how to care for this unique plant with the proper lighting, soil, water, temperature, humidity, and tips to help keep this plant healthy and happy!

Philodendron Imperial Green Care

Light

Philodendron Imperial Green grows best in bright, indirect sunlight but can tolerate low light conditions. It will grow slower in low light, and the leaves will be smaller. If you want your plant to grow faster, place it in a bright spot near a window where it can receive indirect sunlight.

They adjust themselves according to the light conditions, so don’t worry if you cannot provide bright sunlight all the time. Just make sure that it is not in complete darkness. Avoid exposing it to direct sunlight for too long as it can scorch the leaves. A spot in your house window that receives morning sun and afternoon shade is perfect for this plant to thrive well.

I like to use a light meter to measure the light in the Philodendron’s environment. This gives me a good idea of how much light it receives and whether I need to move it to a brighter or darker location.

Light meters are cheap and can help you determine the right light for your plant. Philodendrons require a minimum of 200 lux of light to maintain healthy growth but do best between 500-800 lux.

Soil

Philodendron Imperial Green prefers a well-draining, moisture retentive soil. Don’t use regular garden soil only. A typical garden soil becomes dense when used in pots, leading to problems like excess moisture and lousy drainage.

All these factors ultimately lead to the problem of root rot, and If it is left unchecked for a long time, it can kill the plant. So while choosing a potting mix for your plant, you have to be extra careful as it is the growth medium for your plant.

A potting mix with 50% potting mix and 50% other draining substances like pumice, orchid bark, vermiculite, and perlite work great for this plant. This will provide Philodendron Imperial Green with the perfect drainage and moisture retention mixture.

Pumice rock is ideal for Imperial Green as it is light and airy. It has a lot of small holes in it that help with drainage and aeration. Pumice can be easily found at your local gardening store or online.

Orchid bark is another excellent drainage material that your Philodendron will love. It is light and airy like pumice but also has some nutrients that your plant can use.

Vermiculite is a great moisture-retentive material that will help keep Imperial Green’s roots nice and moist.

Perlite is similar to vermiculite but does not retain moisture as well. It is mainly used for drainage purposes.

Water

Philodendron Imperial Green is a tropical plant, and it loves moisture. It cannot tolerate drought conditions for a long time. The potting mix should always be moist but not soggy or wet.

Allow the top inch of the soil to dry out before watering again. Yellow leaves are the first sign that your plant is thirsty so keep an eye on them.

The Imperial Green is a fast grower, so that it will need more water in the growing season compared to the winter season. Avoid overwatering as it can lead to problems like root rot and yellow leaves.

How to tell when your Plant Needs Watering

To see whether your plant needs water or not, insert your finger in the soil up to the second knuckle. If it feels dry, then it is time to water your plant.

You can also use the weight method to see whether your plant needs watering or not. Pick up the pot; if it feels light, it means that the plant has used up all the water in the pot, and it is time to water it.

How to Water Your Plant

Water it deeply until the water starts coming out of the drainage hole, or you can also bottom water your plant. Place the pot in a sink full of water and let the plant absorb moisture from the roots for about 15-20 minutes. It will absorb as much water as it needs.

Please do not leave it any longer as it can lead to root rot. After watering, allow the plant to drain completely before placing it back in its spot.

Philodendron Imperial Green is a fast grower so it will need more water in the growing season compared to the winter season. Avoid overwatering as it can lead to problems like root rot and yellow leaves.

Fertilizer

Philodendron Imperial Green does not need to be fertilized too often but feeding it can push its growth. Feed your plant with a balanced fertilizer once a month in the spring and summer and every six to eight weeks in the fall and winter.

I prefer a liquid fertilizer as it is easy to apply, and the plant can absorb it quickly. You can also use slow-release fertilizer that does not need to be applied often. Just ensure you are not applying too much fertilizer as it can lead to problems like leaf burn.

Like watering, it’s always better to under-fertilize rather than over-fertilize it. You can also mix organic fertilizers like compost or manure in the potting mix, providing a slow and steady supply of nutrients to your plant.

You can also use an organic fertilizer such as compost or worm castings. These organic fertilizers release nutrients slowly and steadily, providing Imperial Green with a constant source of nutrition.

Fish emulsion is another excellent organic fertilizer that you can use. It is made from fish waste and contains many nutrients that your Philodendron will love. This stuff is a bit on the stinky side, but it does make your plant happy.

Growth

Philodendron Imperial Green is a fast-growing plant and can reach up to 20 feet in length. It has aerial roots that help it climb trees or other support structures. The leaves are dark green and have a glossy texture. They can grow up to 12 inches long and six inches wide.

Philodendron Imperial Green produces white flowers that have a sweet fragrance. Orange berries follow the flowers. You will most likely only see these flowers in ideal conditions. Kept as a household, you probably will not be seeing these.

Philodendron Imperial Green is native to the tropical regions of South America and thrives in a humid, warm environment. The Imperial Green is an excellent choice for those looking for a fast-growing tropical Philodendron.

It is also a great plant for those new to Philodendron care. Philodendron Imperial Green is easy to care for and is a very rewarding plant to grow.

Temperature

Being a tropical plant, Philodendron Imperial Green loves warm temperatures. It cannot tolerate cold conditions for long. This Philodendron prefers a temperature range between 60-85°F (16-30°C).

If the temperature falls below 50°F (10°C), it can stunt the growth and damage the plant. It will also not grow well in very high temperatures so avoid keeping it in a place where the temperature does not exceed too much above 85 degrees Fahrenheit.

During the winter, move the plant away from any cold drafts and place it in a warmer spot. Philodendrons cannot handle frost conditions, so if the temperature outside falls below freezing, it is best to bring the plant inside.

Humidity

Philodendron Imperial Green loves humidity as it grows in the tropical rainforests where the humidity is too high. If you want to see your plant grow healthy, maintain 40-60% humidity at least. If you increase the moisture up to 70-90%, the plant will grow even larger leaves, so if you want to provide extra moisture to your plant, prepare for the growth!

The easiest way to do that is by placing the pot on a tray filled with pebbles and water. This will create a humid environment around the plant.

You can also use a humidifier in the room where Philodendron is kept. Just make sure the leaves of the plant are not touching the water as it can lead to leaf rot. You can also move it to the more humid places like the bathroom and kitchen.

Misting the leaves can also help to increase the humidity but be sure not to over-wet the leaves as it can also lead to fungal diseases if there is not enough aeration around the plant.

How Does Misting Work?

It provides the Philodendron with moisture, but it evaporates quickly, so you need to mist the plant several times a day, especially during the summer season.

If you live in an arid area of the country, you can use a humidifier to increase the humidity around your Philodendron. You can also move your Philodendron to a more humid environment, such as the bathroom or kitchen.

Pruning

Philodendron Imperial Green does not require pruning, but if you want to keep it in a particular size or shape, you can do that. It is a self-heading variety and does not spread its stems so wildly.

If you see any yellow or brown leaves, remove them with your hands or a sharp knife. Be sure to use a clean and sterilized knife or shears to avoid the spread of any fungal or bacterial disease.

Pruning your plant also helps encourage new growth and keep the pests away.

Repotting

You can repot your Philodendron Imperial Green every two or three years in the spring season. When you see that the plant has outgrown its pot and looks top-heavy, it is time to repot it.

Take a pot that is one or two inches larger in diameter than the current pot. Gently remove the plant from the pot and shake off any excess soil from the roots. Place it in the new pot and fill it with fresh potting mix. Handle it gently while repotting, and avoid breaking its roots or stems.

How Do you Know When it’s Time To Repot?

  • When the roots start to come out of the drainage holes
  • If the plant leaves start to yellow or wilted due to not enough water
  • The plant stops growing or growing very slowly
  • If the potting mix dries out quickly, you may need to change out the soil

Propagation

Philodendron Imperial Green can be propagated by stem or root cuttings. It is a straightforward plant to reproduce.

To propagate by Stem or Root Cutting:

  1. Take a 4-6 inches long stem or root cutting from the plant containing at least one node with the help of a clean knife.
  2. Remove the lower leaves, if any.
  3. Now, dip the cutting in a rooting hormone and plant it in a pot filled with fresh potting mix.

Philodendron cuttings can also be propagated in water, but roots take a little longer to develop.

Just take a stem cutting and put it in a jar or vase containing water. Change the water every week, and in 2-3 weeks, you will see the roots developing. Now, you can plant it in a pot filled with fresh mix.

If you have a mature plant, you can propagate by division. Philodendron plants can be divided into several parts during potting or repotting. You will want to take the plant out of the pot and divide it into two or more components with the help of a sharp knife. Now, pot each part in a separate pot filled with fresh potting mix.

Pet Safety

Philodendron Imperial Green is considered toxic to pets like cats and dogs if ingested. It contains insoluble calcium oxalates that can cause oral irritation, vomiting, difficulty swallowing, diarrhea, and other stomach-related issues in pets.

So keep your plant out of reach of your pets. If you think your pet has ingested it, take it to the vet immediately.

Common Problems

One of the most common problems with Philodendron Imperial Green is root rot. It is caused by overwatering or poorly draining soil.

If the roots of this plant sit in water for too long, they start to rot, and the plant begins to wilt. The leaves sometimes also turn yellow and brown, and eventually, the plant dies. Another common problem with Philodendron is leaf spot.

They are caused by fungi or bacteria and can be prevented by providing good air circulation around the plant. If you see any yellow or brown spots on the plant leaves, remove them with a sharp knife.

Pests

It can also get attacked by pests like mealybugs, spider mites, and aphids. These are sap-sucking insects and weaken the plant gradually. These pests are more common in indoor plants.

How to get rid of these pesky problems?

Mealybugs

If you see white, cottony masses on the stems or leaves of your Philodendron, it is probably mealybugs. You can get rid of them by spraying the plant with neem oil or rubbing alcohol.

Spider mites

are very tiny pests that are hard to spot with the naked eye. If you see small webs on the plant, it is probably spider mites. You can get rid of them by spraying the plant with water or insecticidal soap.

Aphids

These are green or black bugs that suck the sap from the plant’s leaves. You can get rid of them by spraying the plant with water or neem oil.

A good insecticidal pest control recipe:

  • One tablespoon of dish soap
  • One tablespoon of neem oil
  • One quart of water

Directions:

Mix all the ingredients and spray them on the plant. This will help to get rid of the pest long-term.

You can also use organic pest control using ladybugs, lacewings, and parasitic wasps. They are natural predators of mealybugs, spider mites, and aphids. You can buy them online or at your local garden center.

Diseases

Philodendron plants are also susceptible to diseases like fungal and bacterial leaf spot, powdery mildew, and root rot. -Fungal and bacterial leaf spot: These diseases are caused by fungi or bacteria and can be prevented by providing good air circulation around the plant.

FAQ:

Q: Why are my plant’s leaves turning brown?

A: Philodendron plants are susceptible to diseases like fungal and bacterial leaf spot, powdery mildew, and root rot. If you see any yellow or brown spots on the plant leaves, remove them with a sharp knife.

Q: How can I prevent Philodendron plants from getting pests?

A: You can prevent Philodendron plants from getting pests by using ladybugs, lacewings, and parasitic wasps. They are natural predators of mealybugs, spider mites, and aphids. You can buy them online or at your local garden center.

Q: How often should I water Philodendron plants?

A: Philodendron plants should be watered when the top inch of soil is dry. Overwatering can cause root rot, so be sure to water only when necessary.

Q: What is the best way to eliminate diseases in Philodendron plants?

A: The best way to get rid of diseases on Philodendron plants is to provide good air circulation around the plant. You can also prevent diseases or pests by using ladybugs, lacewings, and parasitic wasps.

Q: Help, I overwatered my plant, and it’s dying. Can I save it?

A: Philodendron plants are susceptible to root rot. If you overwater your plant, the roots will start to rot, and the plant will begin to wilt.

The leaves sometimes also turn yellow and brown, and eventually, the plant dies. To save your plant, you can try replanting it in well-draining soil and ensuring that you water only when the top inch of soil is dry. It is probably too late to save your plant if your roots are already soft and mushy.

Q: Can Philodendron plants grow in low light?

A: Philodendron plants can grow in low light, but they will not flower. Inadequate lighting may also result in leggy growth or stunted growth. It may also affect the bright green leaf coloring, turning them pale and thin. If you want your Philodendron plant to thrive, it is best to place it in a bright, sunny spot.

Q: Is the Imperial Green a rare Philodendron?

A: No, the Imperial Green is not a rare Philodendron, unlike the Philodendron hederaceum, The Philodendron Pink Princess, or the Philodendron gloriosum.

Q: Where can I buy the Philodendron Imperial Green?

A: You can find Philodendron Imperial Green at your local nursery or online. Many plant meets, or plant swap events may have them as well.

Q: Where can I find a plant swap meetup?

A: You can find a plant swap meetup online or check your local community events calendar. Meetup or Facebook is a great place to find these events.

Conclusion

Philodendron Imperial Green is a very hardy plant that can tolerate many conditions but is still susceptible to some problems. By taking proper care of your plant and being vigilant, you can prevent or solve these problems quickly.

This Philodendron variety is an evergreen climber that can grow up to 20 feet in length. Philodendron Imperial Green has large, dark green leaves that have a glossy texture.

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